85505 - HISTORY OF EASTERN EUROPE, NATION-BUILDING AND PROTECTION OF MINORITIES

Scheda insegnamento

Anno Accademico 2017/2018

Conoscenze e abilità da conseguire

Il corso è volto a provvedere lo studente delle principali dinamiche politiche e sociali che hanno coinvolto i paesi dell’area definita all'interno della cornice terminologica di ‘Europa Orientale’ nel corso dei secoli XX e XXI. Lo studente che abbia frequentato e superato l’esame è in grado di disporre di una solida conoscenza, e di concepire progetti originali di approfondimento scientifico, delle seguenti dinamiche:  Il processo di formazione dello stato nazionale moderno, il tema della modernizzazione e l’organizzazione delle nazionalità, in relazione alle diverse congiunture storico-politiche, in Europa Orientale;  Le differenti concettualizzazioni dell’etnia e della lingua come principi strutturanti della statualità.  L’autodeterminazione dei popoli: maggioranze e minoranze nazionali in Europa Orientale.  Conflitti d’età post-sovietica: Zone grigie d’Europa

Programma/Contenuti

The course will be focused on two major conceptual and research issues:

 

1) Introductory Module

Empire and Nations: From Inclusive to Exclusive Identities in East-Central Europe

(Class 1 - Class 7)

 

2) Thematic Module

Between Communism and Post-Communism: Post-Soviet Revolutionary Cycles, Migration and Contested Borders

(Class 8 - Class 15)

 

Course Outline:

 

Class 1

Introduction to the course and overview of the key concepts

Introductory Reading: Jakob Mikanowski, Goodbye, Eastern Europe!, Los Angeles Review of Books, 27/01/2017.

See more at: https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/goodbye-eastern-europe/.

 

Class 2

Nations and Nationalism: A Theoretical Framework

Introductory Reading: 'Introduction' from B. Anderson, 'Imagined Communities', Verso, 1983: 1-7.

See more at: 'Teaching Material - Class 2'.

 

Class 3

Empires and Nations in East-Central Europe: Between the National and Social questions

Suggested Reading: S. Plokhy, 'Beyond Nationality', Ab Imperio, 4, 2007: 25-46.

See more at: 'Teaching Material - Class 3'.

 

Class 4

The Ottoman and Habsburg Empires: Ethnocultural Frame, Imperial Rule and Roads to Modernization

Suggested Readings:

S. Berger and A. Miller. 'Nationalizing Empires'. Central European University Press, 2012 (selected pages: 369-460)

 

Class 5

The Tsarist Empire: A Multiethnic History

Suggested Readings:

S. Berger and A. Miller. 'Nationalizing Empires'. Central European University Press, 2012 (selected pages: 309-368)

 

Class 6

National Majorities/Minorities: Self-Determination and National Borders in the aftermath of the First World War

Suggested Reading:

From H. Huttenbach, F. Privitera (eds.), 'Self-Determination. From Versailles to Dayton Its Historical Legacy', Selected Pages: 15-30; 145-167.

See more at: 'Teaching Material - Class 6'.

 

Class 7

The Russian Revolution: The Soviet Way to Self-Determination

Suggested Reading:

From J. Smith, 'Red Nations. The Nationalities Experience in and after the USSR', Selected Pages: 53-75; 90-96.

 

Class 8

Soviet symbols and the National Question in the Interwar Period

Suggested Reading:

From J. Smith, 'Red Nations. The Nationalities Experience in and after the USSR', Selected Pages: 97-104; 107-121.

 

Class 9

From the Soviet to the Post-Soviet: An Economic, Social and Political Evolution

Introductory Readings:

From M. Bassin, C. Kelly, 'Soviet and Post-Soviet Identities', Selected Pages: 3-36.

or

From 'Second Hand Time' by Svetlana Aleksievich. The Times Literary Supplement, 11/05/2016.

See more at: 'Teaching Material - Class 9'.

 

Class 10

Remapping the Post-Soviet Space: New Nations and Grey Areas in Europe

Suggested Reading:

From R. Brubaker, 'Nationalism Reframed. Nationhood and the National Question in the New Europe', Selected Pages: 23-54.

See more at: 'Teaching Material - Class 10'

 

Class 11

Post-Soviet Russia: In Search of New Roots

Suggested Reading:

A. P. Tsygankov, 'The Strong State in Russia: Development and Crisis', Oxford University Press, 2014. Selected Pages: 103-115; 167-178.

See more at: 'Teaching Material - Class 11'

 

Class 12

Post-Soviet Ukraine: A Contested Nation Building

Suggested Reading:

A. Pikulicka-Wilczewska, R. Sakwa (eds.), Ukraine and Russia: People, Politics, Propaganda and Perspectives, E-International Relations, 2015 (web: http://www.e-ir.info/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Ukraine-and-Russia-E-IR.pdf ; selected chapters: 9-35; 101-108).

 

Class 13

Between EU and Eurasia: Integration, Crisis and Revolutions

Suggested Reading:

A. P. Tsygankov, 'The Strong State in Russia: Development and Crisis', Oxford University Press, 2014. Selected Pages: 189-201.

See more at: 'Teaching Material - Class 13'

 

Class 14

(Un-)Moving Migrations in the Post-Soviet Era

Introductory Reading:

Vladimir Malakhov, 'Us and Them. Post-Soviet Migration in Russia and (re)making Symbolic Boundaries', Eurozine.

See more at: http://www.eurozine.com/us-and-them-2/

 

Class 15

Human Rights and Protest movements in Contemporary Russia

Suggested Readings:

2015-16 Survey: Religious Belief and National Belonging in Central and Eastern Europe, from Pew Research Center. 10/05/2017.

See more at: http://www.pewforum.org/2017/05/10/religious-belief-and-national-belonging-in-central-and-eastern-europe/

Sergey Zhavoronkov, 'How Russians Protest', Intersection, 15/03/2017.

See more at: http://intersectionproject.eu/article/politics/how-russians-protest.


Testi/Bibliografia


Compulsory Readings for all the students
:

- E. Hobsbawm, Nation and Nationalism since 1780, Cambridge University Press, 2012. (Introduction. Chapters: 1; 4-5).

- S. Berger and A. Miller, Nationalizing Empires, Central European University Press, 2015 (Selected pages: 1-30; 309-460).

- J. Smiths, Red Nations: The Nationalities Experience in and after the USSR, Cambridge University Press, 2013.

 

Only for Non-Attending Students (Additional Reading):

- R. Brubaker, Nationalism Reframed: Nationhood and the National Question in the New Europe, Cambridge University Press, 1996 (Introduction; Chapters 1-2-3-5-6).

 

Only for Attending Students:

See the Suggested Readings and Case Studies List for paper submission in 'Teaching Material'.

 

 

Metodi didattici

Each class will be opened by the professor. The topics can be debated with the students on the basis of the introductory/suggested readings (see “Course Outline”).

Modalità di verifica dell'apprendimento


Attending students

The assessment of the acquisition of expected knowledge and abilities by the attending students is based on the following levels:

1. Short essay (max 5000 words, including footnotes and references, worth 50% of the final grade);

2. Final oral exam (worth 50% of the final grade) on the Syllabus and on topics covered during classes.

 

The short essay must be based on a topic chosen by the student and previously agreed by the instructor, among the topics covered in the syllabus and suggested in the Reading List and Case Studies.

 

The short essay must be emailed to the instructor in either .doc or .pdf format no later than two weeks (15 days) prior to the day of the final oral exam. Essays submitted beyond that deadline will not be marked.

The oral exam is articulated through a discussion of the case study chosen by the student for her/his essay. The oral exam is aimed at testing the student's ability to verbally articulate themes and methods discussed in class, offering the student the opportunity to show her/his ability to critically reassess such material.

In particular, it will be assessed the ability of the student to participate actively in class. If combined with the achievement of a coherent framework of the topics developed during the lessons, the application of critical sense and suitable means of expression will be considered and evaluated with the maximum grading = A (27-30 con lode).

Attendance, if joint to a predominantly mnemonic acquisition of course's contents and discontinuous language and logical skills will be assessed in a grading range from good (B = 24-26) to satisfactory (C = 21-23).

Attendance, with a minimum level of knowledge of the course contents, combined with training gaps or inadequate language and logical skills, it will get as grade ‘barely passing' (D = 18-20).

The absence of a minimum level of knowledge of the course contents, combined with inadequate language and logical skills and training gaps, it will produce a fail (E) grading, even in spite of an assiduous attendance.

 

Non-attending students

The exam consists of an oral examination on the compulsory (plus additional) readings.

Non-attending students will be assessed primarily on the ability to use literature and multimedia tools made available, in order to properly expose the contents of the course. This ability, when combined with the achievement of a coherent framework of the course's themes, the application of critical sense, and suitable means of expression will be considered and evaluated with the maximum grading = A (27-30 con lode).

A predominantly mnemonic acquisition of course's contents along with discontinuous language and logical skills will be assessed in a grading range from good (B = 24-26) to satisfactory (C = 21- 23).

A minimum level of knowledge of the course contents, combined with training gaps or inadequate language and logical skills, it will get as grade ‘barely passing' (D = 18-20).

The absence of a minimum level of knowledge of the course contents, combined with inadequate language and logical skills and training gaps, it will produce a fail (E) grading.


Strumenti a supporto della didattica

The attending students will be provided with power point presentations and additional material analyzed during the classes.

Orario di ricevimento

Consulta il sito web di Marco Puleri