85493 - SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY

Scheda insegnamento

  • Docente Selenia Marabello

  • Crediti formativi 6

  • SSD M-DEA/01

  • Modalità di erogazione In presenza (Convenzionale)

  • Lingua di insegnamento Inglese

Anno Accademico 2017/2018

Conoscenze e abilità da conseguire

The course aims at providing students abilities in cultural analysis with special reference to the making and representation of cultural diversity. The course aims at improving students participation, providing the gain of a specialistic terminology and of a critical attitude toward social and cultural facts.

Programma/Contenuti

The course Social Anthropology will begin with an overview of the main theories and methodological issues dealing with the ethnographic fieldwork. As a discipline that has traditionally been founded on concepts of culture and identity, anthropology has long been engaged in conducting ethnography in heritage sites and on cultural objects and their relationships with issues such as memory, belonging, community and nation-building. Over the past decades, attention has shifted to focus on state and non-state practices that produce heritage at local and sovra-national levels. This course aims to explore how state, community, migration and social relations are implied and re-fashioned in and by the processes through which culture is made into heritage.

Testi/Bibliografia

For students attending the course

  • Robben A. C. G., Sluka J. (eds.) 2012, Ethnographic Fieldwork: An Anthropological Reader (ch. 2, 3, 4, 20, 24, 29, 32, 34, 35).
  • Appadurai A., 1986, Social Life of Things. Commodities in Cultural Perspective, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press (ch. 1, 2).
  • Clifford J., 1988, The Predicament of Cultures, Cambridge, Harvard University Press (ch. 10).
  • Geismar H., 2015, “Anthropology and Heritage Regimes”, Annual Review of Anthropology 2015 44: 71-85.
  • Aria, M., Cristofano, M., Maltese, S., 2014, “The Fort Apollonia Museum of Nzema Culture and History: Development Challenges and Shared Heritage-Making Process in South-West Ghana”, in P. Basu, W. Modest, (eds.), Museum, Heritage and International Development, London, Routledge, pp. 246-276.
  • Scott J., Selwyn T. (eds), 2010, Thinking through Tourism, Oxford New York, Berg (selected chapters)

For students non-attending the course

  • Robben A. C. G., Sluka J. (eds.) 2012, Ethnographic Fieldwork: An Anthropological Reader (ch. 2, 3, 4, 20, 24, 29, 32, 34, 35).
  • Appadurai A., 1986, Social Life of Things. Commodities in Cultural Perspective, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press (ch. 1, 2).
  • Clifford J., 1988, The Predicament of Cultures, Cambridge, Harvard University Press (ch. 10).
  • Geismar H., 2015, “Anthropology and Heritage Regimes”, Annual Review of Anthropology 2015 44: 71-85.
  • Aria, M., Cristofano, M., Maltese, S., 2014, “The Fort Apollonia Museum of Nzema Culture and History: Development Challenges and Shared Heritage-Making Process in South-West Ghana”, in P. Basu, W. Modest, (eds.), Museum, Heritage and International Development, London, Routledge, pp. 246-276.
  • Scott J., Selwyn T. (eds.), 2010, Thinking through Tourism, Oxford New York, Berg.

Metodi didattici

The course will be organised to include both lectures and seminar classes, aiming at facilitating an informed critical debate on the main issues/topics. Students are expected to actively participate, debating their arguments and informed opinions on the basis of the required readings. A detailed syllabus will be handed out at the beginning of the course.

In order to foster students’ ability to examine case-studies and ethnographies for theoretical purposes, participants will be encouraged to draw extensively on relevant empirical material.

Modalità di verifica dell'apprendimento

Attending Students

The course will be assessed through one hour-long written examination (50%) (two open questions), one essay of 2,000 words (25%), and active participation in the seminar class (25%).

Active participation combined with a consistent comprehension of the topics and well-argued critical approach will be considered and evaluated with the maximum grade (A = 27-30 con lode).

Attendance combined with a predominantly mnemonic acquisition of the course's contents will be assessed based on a grading scale ranging from good (B = 24-26) to satisfactory (C = 21-23).

Attendance combined with a minimum level of comprehension of the course content and some knowledge gaps will result in a ‘barely passing' grade (D = 18-20).

The absence of a minimum level of knowledge of the course content will result in a failing (E) grade, even in cases of assiduous attendance.

Non-attending students

The course will be assessed exclusively on the basis of one hour-long written examination.

For full details, non-attending students are kindly requested to contact the lecturer before beginning to prepare the exam.

Non-attending students will be assessed primarily on their ability to use the bibliographical resources to properly discuss and outline the content of the course. This ability combined with a consistent comprehension of the topics, the adoption of an informed and well-argued critical approach and a precise use of disciplinary language will be considered and evaluated with the maximum grade (A = 27-30 con lode).

A predominantly mnemonic acquisition of the course content and inadequate use of disciplinary language will be assessed based on a grading scale ranging from good (B = 24-26) to satisfactory (C = 21-23).

A minimum level of comprehension of the course content and concepts will result in a ‘barely passing' grade (D = 18-20).

The absence of a minimum level of knowledge of the course content will result in a failing (E) grade.

Orario di ricevimento

Consulta il sito web di Selenia Marabello