69901 - PAN-EUROPEAN SECURITY

Scheda insegnamento

  • Docente Sonia Lucarelli

  • Crediti formativi 8

  • SSD SPS/04

  • Modalità di erogazione In presenza (Convenzionale)

  • Lingua di insegnamento Inglese

  • Orario delle lezioni dal 27/02/2018 al 23/05/2018

Anno Accademico 2017/2018

Conoscenze e abilità da conseguire

Students are expected to learn the evolution of security dynamics in the pan-European space. In particular, they will be expected (i) to develop an understanding of some key turning points in Soviet/Russian-American-European relations (early Cold War, Détente, post-Cold War) and of how they shaped and influenced security in Europe during the Cold War and after; (ii) to learn about the evolution of the main international organizations active in European security both during and after the Cold War; and (iii) to learn about the evolution of the concept of security particularly since the end of the Cold War.

Programma/Contenuti

The security Concept

Theorizing Security: Realism, Liberalism, Constructivism and Post-Positivism

Theorizing Security: Security Governance and Securitization

European security during the Cold War 

The Post-Cold War Transition

First challenges to European security in the post-Cold War Era: the breakup of Yugoslavia

NATO: history, functioning, partnerships, operations and relations with Russia

The EU: structural foreign policy, CSDP, migration policy, Non-CSDP Security-building policies

Other Organizations: The OSCE, The Shanghai Cooperation Organization and CSTO

Issues: Nonproliferation; Energy security; Cybersecurity, Transnational criminality; Counter-terrorism

Testi/Bibliografia

SYLLABUS WITH READING

PART ONE: THE CONCEPTS

1

What is security?

Seminar - Reading:

  1. Paul D. Williams, “Introduction”, in Security Studies : an Introduction, Routledge 2013 (2nd ed - NB also the 2008 edition is fine and is available online: http://hamdoucheriad.yolasite.com/resources/security%20studies.pdf).).

  2. Andrew Cottey, Chapter I: “Security in the 21st Century Europe”, in Security in the 21st Century Europe, Palgrave, Macmillan, 2013, pp. 6-33.

2

What is “European” Security?

Seminar - Reading: same as above

 

3

IR and Security (1): Realism and Liberalism

Seminar with students' presentation*

Reading:

Paul D. Williams “Security Studies : an Introduction”, Routledge 2013 (2nd ed): chapters 2 (Realism) and 3 (Liberalism); (Ruffilli Library 355.033. NB also the 2008 edition is fine and is available online: http://hamdoucheriad.yolasite.com/resources/security%20studies.pdf ).

* students’ presentations on:

(i) A realist approach to European security (e.g. John Mearsheimer’s view of European security);

(ii) A liberal approach to European security (e.g. John Ikenberry’s view of European security)

 

4

IR and Security (3): Constructivism and Post-Positivism

Seminar with students' presentation*

Reading:

Paul D. Williams “Security Studies : chapters: 5 (Constructivism); 7 (Critical Theory) (Ruffilli Library 355.033. NB also the 2008 edition is fine and is available online: http://hamdoucheriad.yolasite.com/resources/security%20studies.pdf ).

* students’ presentations on:

(i) A constructivist approach to European security

(ii) Critical theory and the analysis of European security: a case-study (e.g. Critical Theory and the analysis of counterterrorism in Europe)

 

5

Securitization, identity and culture

Reading:

  1. Iver Neumann, "National security, culture and Identity” In The Routledge Handbook of Security Studies. Edited by Myriam Dunn Cavelty and Victor Mauer, 94-104. Abingdon, UK, and New York: Routledge, 2010 [course material]

  2. Jef Huysmans, “Revisiting Copenhagen: Or, On the Creative Development of a Security Studies Agenda in Europe.” European Journal of International Relations 4.4 (1998): 479–505. Available at: https://www.academia.edu/18912085/Revisiting_Copenhagen_Or_On_the_Creative_Development_of_a_Security_Studies_Agenda_in_Europe

6

Security Governance

Seminar with Students’ presentation*

Reading:

  1. Mark Webber , “Security Governance”, in James Sperling (ed) Handbook of Governance and Security, Edward Elgar, Northampton USA, 2014, pp. 17-40. [course material]

  2. James Sperling. “Regional security Governance”, in James Sperling (ed) Handbook of Governance and Security, Edward Elgar, Northampton USA, 2014, pp. 98-119 [course material].

* 2 Students’ presentation on a case study of regional security governance

 

PART TWO: HISTORICAL ROOTS

7

European security during the Cold War

Students’ presentations:

  1. What was security during the Cold War?

  2. Proliferation and non proliferation during the Cold War

  3. Arms control during the Cold War

  4. The Cold War and security institutions in Europe

Background reading for the class: Antony Best et al., International History of the Twentieth Century and Beyond , London and New York, Routledge, 2009, 2nd edition [course material] Chapters: 9, 11, 20.

 

8

The end of the Cold War: the academic debate

Reading:

  1. Jeremi Suri, Explaining the End of the Cold War: a New Historical Consensus?, “Journal of Cold War Studies”, 4, Fall 2002, pp. 60-92 on line at [course material]

  2. Michael Cox, "Another Transatlantic Split? American and European Narratives and the End of the Cold War," Cold War History, Vol. 7 No 1, February 2007, p. 121-146. [course material]

  3. Adam Roberts, An 'Incredibly Swift Transition': reflections on the end of the Cold War, in M. Leffler & A. Westad (eds.), The Cambridge History of the Cold War, Vol.III: 2010 [course material]

 

9

The Post-Cold War Transition

Seminar with students’ presentations*

Reading:

  1. John Ikenberry, “The restructuring of the international system after the Cold War”, in M. Leffler & A. Westad (eds.), The Cambridge History of the Cold War, Vol. III: 2010 [course material]

  2. Antony Best et al., International History of the Twentieth Century and Beyond , London and New York, Routledge, 2009, 2nd edition, Chapters 20 and 22 [course material].

* Students' presentations on:

(i) The transformation of US's role after the Cold War

(ii) The transformation of Russia’s foreign policy after the Cold War

 

10

First challenges to European security in the post-Cold War Era: the breakup of Yugoslavia

Seminar with students' presentations*

Reading:

S. Lucarelli, Europe and the breakup of Yugoslavia : a political failure in search of a scholarly explanation, 2000, pp. 11-74 [materiale online ]

* students’ presentations:

(i) the Dayton Peace agreement 20 years on;

(ii) The “other” Balkan wars

 

PART THREE: THE ACTORS

11

The European Union: EU's peculiar foreign policy

Lecture with students' presentation*

Reading:

  1. James Sperling, “European Union” in James Sperling (ed) Handbook of Governance and Security, Edward Elgar, Northampton USA, 2014, pp. 588-617 [course material]

  2. Keukeleire, S. & T. Delreux, The Foreign Policy of the European Union, 2nd edition, Palgrave Macmillan, 2014, Chapters 1 and 2. [course material]

* students' presentation:

(i) Historical evolution of EU’s external relations

(ii) The EU as a special type of power (civilian, normative, soft…) and the concept of “structural foreign policy”.

 

12

The EU: The European Union's Common Security and Defence Policy

Seminar with students' presentation*

Reading:

Keukeleire, S. & T. Delreux, The Foreign Policy of the European Union, 2nd edition, Palgrave Macmillan, 2014, Chapters 7, 8. [course material]

* students' presentation on:

(i) EU missions;

(ii) non CSDP external relations: the security component.

(iii) The EU Global Strategy: the document and the debate

(iv) The effects of Brexit on the CSDP

 

13

Guest Lecture – The EU Global Strategy

 

14

Seminar and Debate

- Seminar: Evaluating EU’s foreign policy

Reading:

Patrick Müller, “EU foreign policy: no major breakthrough despite multiple crises”, [http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/geui20/38/3] Vol. 38 , Iss. 3, 2016 [course material]

- STUDENTS’ DEBATE: A European Army? Should the EU develop its own unitary and independent army?

 

15

11. NATO: history and functioning

Seminar with students' presentation*

Reading:

  1. David Yost, “NATO's evolving Purpose and the next geo-strategic Concept,” International Affairs 86:2 (March 2010), pp.489-522 . [course material]

  2. Andrew Cottey, “NATO”, in James Sperling (ed) Handbook of Governance and Security, Edward Elgar, Northampton USA, 2014, pp. 638-655. [course material]

* Students presentation on:

(i) historical developments (main steps);

(ii) NATO’S Strategic concepts (with particular attention to the core tasks set in the latest SC)

(iv) NATO’s operations

 

16

NATO: Partnerships, enlargements and relations with Russia

Seminar with students' presentation*

Reading:

same as above plus:

  1. Gülnur Aybet, “The Four Stages of NATO's Partnership Frameworks: Rethinking Regional Partnerships with the Middle East and North Africa”, Paper presented at the conference DYNAMIC CHANGE. Rethinking NATO's Capabilities, Operations and Partnerships , University of Bologna, October 26-27, 2012 [available at: http://www.act.nato.int/images/stories/events/2012/acor/dynamic_change.pdf].

  2. Hall Gardner, “The Russia annexation of Crimea: regional and global ramifications”, [http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rpep21/17/4] Vol. 17 , Iss. 4, 2016

Optional: Ch. 5 in: M. Webber, J. Sperling and M. Smith, NATO’s Trajectory into the 21st Century: Decline or Regeneration? (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2012).[course material]

* Students presentation on:

(i) Students’ Presentation: Nato’s enlargements

(ii) NATO-Russia relations: a chronology of events

 

17

Students’ presentation and Debate

  • Students’ presentation on the Warsaw Summit 2016

  • STUDENTS’ DEBATE: Is NATO’s enlargement to Monetenegro legitimate and appropriate?

Positions: Nato’s view; Russia’s view.

 

18

Other Organizations: The OSCE, The Shanghai Cooperation Organization and CSTO

Seminar with students' presentations*

Reading:

  1. Andrew Cottey, “”The other Europe. Regional security governance in Europe's East”, in S. Breslin and S. Croft eds) Comparative Regional Security Governance, Routledge 2012. [course material]

  2. David Galbreath and Aynur Seidyusif, “Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe”, in James Sperling (ed) Handbook of Governance and Security, Edward Elgar, Northampton USA, 2014, pp. 656-670. [course material]

* students' presentation on:

(i) OSCE

(ii) SCO

(iii) CSTO

 

PART FOUR: SECURITY GOVERNANCE AT WORK

19

Guest lecture - Terrorism

 

20

Wednesday 24 May: 11.00-13.00

Energy security and Counter-terrorism

  1. Gawdat Bahgat, “Energy”, in James Sperling (ed) Handbook of Governance and Security, Edward Elgar, Northampton USA, 2014, pp. 360-374. [course material]

  2. Wyn Rees, “Counter-terrorism”, in James Sperling (ed) Handbook of Governance and Security, Edward Elgar, Northampton USA, 2014, pp. 452-474. [course material]

* students' presentations of each of the areas:

(i) energy security,

(ii) Counter-terrorism, bringing examples of contemporary issues at stake (e.g. energy security in the Ukranian crisis; etc…)

(iii) cyber-terrorism (bringing examples of contemporary issues at stake e.g. NATO's cyber-security tasks; or…)

(iv) transnational criminality

____________________________________________________

REFERENCE TEXTS

NB: this is not compulsory reading but material for those who feel they need to gain background information on topics addressed in the course

HISTORY:

  1. Antony Best et al., International History of the Twentieth Century and Beyond , London and New York, Routledge, 2009, 2nd edition [course material].

    EU:

  2. Christopher Hill and Michael Smith (eds) International relations and the European Union Oxford university press, 2011 (2nd ed.). RUFFILLI: 327.094 Relazioni internazionali; 327.4 Europa.

  3. Keukeleire, S. & T. Delreux, The Foreign Policy of the European Union, 2nd edition, Palgrave Macmillan, 2014

Security :

  1. Paul D. Williams “Security Studies : an Introduction”, Routledge 2012 (2nd ed) [1st ed available at:http://hamdoucheriad.yolasite.com/resources/security%20studies.pdf ]

  2. Myriam Dunn Cavelty and Victor Mauer (eds), Routledge Handbook of Security Studies - London : Routledge, 2010 (2nd ed 2017). [1st ed inthe reading material]

Metodi didattici

lectures, seminars, students' presentations

Modalità di verifica dell'apprendimento

NB: Class attendance in compulsory

Students will be evaluated on the basis of:
- class participation
- mid-term paper
- final oral exam

 

The mid-term paper

- Topic to be distributed two weeks before

- length: max 3.000 words plus bibliography

- the text should be scanned through Turnitin

- deadline: May 2, both printed and by email.

 

Rules for presentations:

- 10 minutes each

- power point circulated to the class, inclusive of bibliography

 

Rules for the debates:

 2 groups of 2

- presentation of group A with arguments in favour (5 minutes)

- Q&A with other group (5 minutes)

- presentation by group B with arguments against (5 minutes)

- Q&A with other group (5 minutes)

- Q&A of each with the class (5 + 5 minutes)

- class evaluation of the debate

 

 

 

 

Strumenti a supporto della didattica

power point

Orario di ricevimento

Consulta il sito web di Sonia Lucarelli